Holly Warlick

Basketball

Served as envoy

  • 2019  –  Taiwan

In seven seasons at the helm of Tennessee women’s basketball, Holly Warlick built a very impressive résumé in her young head coaching career. Her worksheet contains accomplishments few coaches achieve in their entire careers, much less as first-time head coaches.

Those successes confirmed that Warlick was the right choice to take the reins at Tennessee and that she and her staff had the acumen to run a championship program. A disciple of the legendary Pat Summitt, Warlick maintained the core values of her former coach, co-worker and friend while at the same time employing her own personality, style and competitive energy to coach today’s players.

Whether as an All-America player from 1976-80, an assistant and associate head coach for 27 seasons from 1985 to 2012, or head coach from 2012 to 2019, Warlick thrived during her more than three decades in the spotlight at Rocky Top. She posted one of the top won-lost records in the nation during her tenure.

Warlick was announced as head coach of the Lady Vols on April 18, 2012, as women’s hoops legend Pat Summitt stepped into the role of head coach emeritus. In a touching and symbolic gesture the following day at a press conference announcing the changes, Summitt presented her coaching whistle to her long-time aide and former floor general.

On the international scene, Warlick was a gold medal coach, and two of her players joined her in earning that hardware. Warlick served as an assistant, while Mercedes Russell and Diamond DeShields played on the undefeated (6-0) 2015 USA World University Games Team in South Korea.

Warlick was recognized personally for her performance. In 2013, members of the Women’s Basketball Coaches Association named her the Spalding Maggie Dixon Division I Rookie Coach of the Year. She was selected by the AP and league coaches as the 2013 SEC Women’s Basketball Coach of the Year, and members of the Tennessee Sports Writers Association also chose her as TSWA Women’s Basketball Coach of the Year that season.

In May 2017, Warlick was recognized for her years of leadership, volunteer activities, philanthropic work and professional accomplishments that have contributed to improving the quality of life in Tennessee. She was named the Tennessee Woman of Distinction at the 32nd annual Chattanooga Women of Distinction Awards luncheon. In 2019, she became a member of the Pat Summitt Foundation Advisory Board.

Carol Jue

Basketball

Served as envoy

  • 2019  –  Taiwan

Chapman’s all-time winningest women’s basketball coach, Jue has won over 300 games in her 17 years at the helm of the Panthers’ program. Over a nearly two-decade coaching career, Jue has won over 69 percent of her games and has led the Panthers to the SCIAC Tournament seven times since joining the conference in 2012-13.

Under her guidance, the Panthers have been considered amongst the elite programs in the West Region. Since 2003, Jue has led Chapman to nine NCAA Division III playoff berths (2004-09, ’11, ’14, ’18) and nine 20-win seasons. She has coached five All-West Region selections, three Academic All-Americans, six Academic All-District honorees and three SCIAC Athletes of the Year.

Jue led the Panthers to their first-ever SCIAC Tournament title in 2017-18 with a double overtime victory over Claremont-Mudd-Scripps. The Panthers had their most successful SCIAC season ever with a 15-1 record in the SCIAC. Chapman went 23-5 overall for its most wins since the 2007-08 season that ended with a 24-4 record. Jue and her staff were recognized as the SCIAC Coaching Staff of the Year for the third year in a row.

In 2010-11, Chapman went 22-6 and as a result, Jue earned Association of Division III Independents Coach of the Year honors for the third time in her career. She has earned SCIAC Coaching Staff of the Year honors in 2015-16, 2016-17 and 2017-18.

She has led her teams into the SCIAC Tournament in each of Chapman’s six seasons in the conference -the only program on campus to accomplish that feat. The Panthers have appeared in the tournament finals four times, winning their first title game in 2017-18. Since joining the SCIAC in the 2012-13 season, Jue has led the Panthers to an incredible 78-18 SCIAC record with at least 10 win in every season.

In May 2009, Jue was also honored by the Chinese Historical Society of Southern California as the only Chinese-American head basketball coach (men’s or women’s) in the NCAA. She has taken her teams on two international tours in Taiwain. The Panthers played in the Jones Cup in 2010 and the BLIA Tournament in 2015.

Jue was no stranger to winning at the NCAA Division III level having spent four prior years at Claremont-Mudd-Scripps Colleges as an assistant coach and serving in the 2002-03 season as the interim head coach.

Jue played collegiately at both Cal State Los Angeles and Claremont-Mudd-Scripps and was selected team MVP and named to the All-SCIAC team while playing at Claremont from 1991-92. She was a two-time All-San Gabriel Valley honoree as a player at Montebello High School in the mid-1980’s and was inducted into the Montebello High Hall of Fame in 2011.

Joe Logan

Baseball

Served as envoy

  • 2008  –  Colombia
  • 2010  –  Taiwan
  • 2011  –  South Korea
  • 2011  –  Philippines
  • 2012  –  Ecuador
  • 2013  –  India
  • 2015  –  Lithuania

Joe Logan was All American pitcher for Florida Southern College when the Moccasins won the NCAA Division II National Championship in 1988. He had previously played for Chipola Junior College where he also won All American honors.

The Montréal Expos took him in the 28th round of the 1989 amateur draft. Joe played minor league ball in the Montréal Expos organization from 1989-1991, then played one year in the independent Northern League in 1993. He was 4-7 with a 2.88 ERA in his pro debut for the Jamestown Jammers to help them to the New York-Penn League title. He split 1990 between the Rockford Expos (10-2, 2.63) and West Palm Beach Expos (1-0, 1.88). Had he qualified, he would have been 5th in the Midwest League in ERA, just ahead of Pat Rapp. Back with West Palm Beach in 1991, he fell to 6-12, 3.18. In 1993, he was 0-1 with a 10.80 ERA for the Sioux Falls Canaries to finish with a 21-22, 3.13 record in pro ball.

After his Major League Baseball career ended, Joe was a minor league pitching coach for the Anaheim Angels from 1994-2000. Since 2002, Joe Logan has served as coach for the Orlando Reds AAU organization and he continues to work with collegiate and professional baseball players on a regular basis.

Barry Larkin

Baseball

Served as envoy

  • 2008  –  Colombia
  • 2010  –  Ecuador
  • 2011  –  India
  • 2012  –  Lithuania
  • 2013  –  South Africa
  • 2015  –  Taiwan

Barry Larkin a 19-year Major Leaguer, 12-time National League All-Star, 1995 N.L. Most Valuable Player and MLB Network studio analyst, spent his entire career with the Cincinnati Reds. Larkin served as Special Assistant to the General Manager for the Washington Nationals, specializing in player development and scouting. Larkin also participated in Major League Baseball’s efforts, led by Jim Lefebvre, to develop and train the Chinese National Baseball Team in preparation for the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing.

Larkin was selected by the Reds in the first round (fourth overall) in 1985 following a standout career at the University of Michigan. Larkin batted .353 in the 1990 World Series to help lead the Reds to a four-game sweep of the Oakland Athletics. He won three consecutive Rawlings Gold Glove Awards from 1994-96. He earned 1995 N.L. MVP honors by hitting .319 with 15 home runs, 66 RBI and 51 stolen bases. In 1996, Larkin became the first Major League shortstop to join the 30-30 club when he hit 33 home runs and stole 36 bases. Larkin was named the Reds’ captain before the 1997 season.

Larkin batted .295, with 2,340 hits, 198 home runs, 960 RBI, 1,329 runs scored and 379 stolen bases. Baseball historian Bill James has called Larkin one of the greatest shortstops of all time, ranking him #6 all-time in his New Bill James Historical Baseball Abstract.

In 1993 Larkin won the Roberto Clemente Award, Major League Baseball’s highest off-field honor, for his philanthropy. In 2008, Larkin released a charity wine called “Barry Larkin’s Merlot,” with 100% of his proceeds supporting Champions Sports Foundation.