Teresa Edwards

Basketball

Served as envoy

  • 2009  –  Mozambique

When she was 20 years old, at the Los Angeles 1984 Olympic Games, Teresa Edwards became the youngest athlete to win an Olympic gold medal in women’s basketball. Sixteen years later, at the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, Edwards became the oldest player to win an Olympic gold medal in women’s basketball.

All told, the sensational 5-foot-11 point guard from Cairo, Georgia, played in five Olympic Games, bringing home four gold medals and one bronze.

It was one heck of a journey for Edwards, whose basketball career began when she and her younger brothers would shoot baskets in their grandmother’s front yard – the basket there was a bicycle rim nailed to a pine tree. A four-year starter for the Cairo High Syrupmakers, Edwards went to the University of Georgia, where she again was a four-year starter, leading the Bulldogs to Final Four appearances in 1983 and 1985, averaging 15.5 points and 5.1 assists for her career.

Edwards made her Olympic debut in 1984 as the Americans breezed to a relatively easy gold medal victory. Led by the standout Cheryl Miller, the United States won all of its games by at least 30 points.

In the 1988 Seoul Games, Edwards averaged team-highs of 16.6 points and 3.4 assists per game as the Americans claimed gold, beating Yugoslavia, 77-70, in the championship game. Four years later in Barcelona, Edwards averaged 12.6 points and 5.4 assists but the United States was upset in the semifinals and had to settle for a bronze medal.

At the Atlanta 1996 Olympic Games, Edwards was selected to read the Athlete’s Oath at the Opening Ceremony and two weeks later she and her teammates returned to the top of the podium. Edwards averaged 6.9 points and 7.2 assists and the United States won each of its games by at least 15 points. At the Sydney 2000 Olympic Games, the 36-year-old Edwards averaged 6.1 points and 3.4 assists as the Americans again won all of their games by double figures to win gold. Edwards also was involved in the London 2012 Olympic Games, serving as the United States’ Chef de Mission.

Sue Wicks

Basketball

Served as envoy

  • 2009  –  Philippines
  • 2010  –  Indonesia
  • 2011  –  Dominican Republic
  • 2013  –  Malaysia
  • 2016  –  Cambodia
  • 2017  –  Jordan

Sue Wicks was a first-round selection by the New York Liberty in the WNBA’s inaugural draft in 1997. Wicks went on to play six seasons with the Liberty, earning an All-Star selection in 2000. She also was the recipient of the Kim Perrot Sportsmanship Award in 2000. Wicks finished her WNBA career in eighth place all-time in blocked shots.

Wicks played collegiately at Rutgers University, where she was a three-time All-American and the 1988 National Player of the Year. She was inducted into Rutgers’ Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame in June 2013.

Nykesha Sales

Basketball

Served as envoy

  • 2009  –  Uganda
  • 2010  –  Cape Verde
  • 2011  –  Haiti
  • 2012  –  Venezuela
  • 2013  –  Ukraine
  • 2014  –  South Korea

The all-time leading scorer in Connecticut Sun history, Nykesha Sales returns to the team for her second season as the community liaison and an assistant to the coaching staff.

In 2013, Sales made numerous community relations appearances on behalf of the Sun, practiced regularly with the team and also provided color commentary on selected team broadcasts.

Sales was the first member of the Connecticut Sun franchise, which began as the Orlando Miracle prior to the 1999 season. She played with the team from 1999-2007, helping the Sun reach two WNBA Finals and four straight Eastern Conference Finals between 2003 and 2006.

A seven-time WNBA All-Star, Sales was the second player in league history to amass 3,000 points, 500 assists and 400 steals during her career – joining Sheryl Swoopes. She finished her career with 3,955 points, 683 assists and 490 steals.

Ebony Hoffman

Basketball

Served as envoy

  • 2009  –  Lebanon
  • 2013  –  Thailand
  • 2014  –  South Africa
  • 2014  –  Rwanda
  • 2015  –  Botswana
  • 2015  –  Mozambique
  • 2015  –  South Africa

Ebony Hoffman (born in 1982), played basketball at USC before being drafted by the Indiana Fever in the 1st round of the 2004 WNBA Draft. Hoffman left Indiana in 2011 when she moved to play for the Los Angeles Sparks. Hoffman spent her final WNBA season with the Connecticut Sun in 2014. Across her 11 seasons, Hoffman started 172 games, averaging 5.8 points per game.

From 2013, Hoffman has been the President and CEO of EbHoops Clinics, an organization geared towards coaching young kids interested in basketball. Hoffman is also currently Assistant Basketball Coach at Windward School in the greater Los Angeles area.

Donna Orender

Basketball

Served as envoy

  • 2009  –  Lebanon

Donna was recruited by Adam Silver to lead the WNBA in its most vulnerable time. She served 6 years as the President/Commissioner of the league, during which time she solidified its base and led double digit growth in all key business metrics.

Orender is a highly respected corporate business leader having led growth and innovation in several high-profile companies. She has been recognized as one of the top 10 Most Powerful Women in Sports and one of Newsweeks100 most Influential people in the business of sports and is a best-selling author with her 2018 release of Wowsdom! the Girl’s Guide to the Positive and the Possible.

In addition, she serves on the nominating and compensation committees for the V Foundation for Cancer Research board, was elected to the executive committee of Maccabi USA and contributes to the boards of the Monique Burr Foundation for Children, the Jacksonville Public Education Fund, the DeVos Sport Business Management Graduate Program at UCF, UNF Brooks School of Health, Co-Chairs the UJA Sports for Youth Initiative and a founding member of the board of W.O.M.E.N, a mentoring organization for young women capable of reaching the C-suite. She has also been a Global Ambassador for Vital Voices, traveling to India to help mentor young women entrepreneurs.

Donna has been a recipient of the March of Dimes Sports Leadership Award and was honored by the UJA-Federation of New York’s Entertainment, Media and Communications Division for her dedication to the community. A Hall of Fame athlete at Queens College, her business acumen and experience make her a sought-after speaker on topics such as leadership, teamwork, motivation and gender/diversity issues.

Carla McGhee

Basketball

Served as envoy

  • 2009  –  Qatar

Carla McGhee enters her first year as a member of the Nevada women’s basketball staff. McGhee, who had a Hall of Fame career at Tennessee before playing five seasons in the WNBA, will assist with team travel, coordinating camps and academics and manage other operational duties for the Wolf Pack.

McGhee brings an impressive basketball résumé to Nevada. She has spent the last four seasons as an assistant coach in the SEC, the last two at Auburn and previously at South Carolina. She also has experience as a consultant and player personnel director with the WNBA, in addition to her playing career in the league from 1998-2003. She also spent two seasons as a sideline reporter for ESPN in addition to previous coaching spots at Temple and Auburn.

Her professional career was preceded by a standout career at Tennessee for legendary coach Pat Summit. While with the Lady Vols from 1986-90, McGhee and the team collected national championships in 1987 and 1989. McGhee was inducted into the Lady Vol Hall of Fame as a member of the class of 2007.

Altogether, McGhee has more than eight years of experience as a collegiate coach and WNBA administrator, along with her 13-year professional career as a player that includes a gold medal at the 1996 Atlanta Olympic Games.

McGhee then played professionally for teams in Germany, France, Turkey, South Korea, Spain, Italy and Greece for six years. With the start of professional leagues in the United States, she earned a spot on the Atlanta Glory of the ABL where she played from 1996 to 1998. From there, she went on to spend five years with the WNBA’s Orlando Miracle.

McGhee’s playing experience includes a lengthy stint in the USA Basketball organization, beginning with the 1987 Sports Festival. She went on to participate in the 1993 World Qualifying, 1994 World Championship and Goodwill Games, the 1995 Pan American Games and the 1996 Olympics. McGhee got her coaching start at Temple during the 2003-04 season when she helped the Owls to an Atlantic 10 Tournament championship and an NCAA Tournament appearance. She played an integral role in developing Candace Dupree into a first round pick in the 2006 WNBA Draft, the first such selection in Temple’s history.

Barbara Turner

Basketball

Served as envoy

  • 2009  –  Georgia

Barbara Turner (born 1984) started her career playing college basketball in Connecticut. In 2006, she was drafted first round by the Seattle Storm to play Guard-Forward. In 2007, she left Seattle for the Houston Comets before she left Houston for the Connecticut Sun in 2008. During her 4 seasons in the WNBA, Turner played 97 games, averaging 6.3 points per game.

Andrea Stinson

Basketball

Served as envoy

  • 2005  –  Algeria
  • 2009  –  Bahrain
  • 2011  –  Jordan

Andrea is considered by many to be the best female player ever from North Carolina. At North Mecklenburg High School, she led her team to two State Championships, and was named player of the year by the High School Association, and Miss Basketball by The Charlotte Observer. She was named the USA Today National Player of the year.

Andrea won AAU National Championships as a ninth grader, and again her junior year when she was MVP (Charlotte Monarchs, now Royals). At NC State she scored 2136 points and was All-Conference and All American.

As a professional she played for the WNBA Charlotte Sting and the Detroit Shock, as well teams in Italy, Turkey, and France. She was a Four Time Italian League All-Star.

Andrea also played on USA Basketball National Teams, participating in the Pan American games, and winning a gold medal in the Jones Cups.

Andrea has been an active participant in The Sports United Envoy Program, traveling to Africa and the Middle East to conduct clinics and events for youth.

After retiring as a player Andrea became a high school coach in NC, and now is the coach at Newton-Conover High School.

Vladimir Stepania

Basketball

Served as envoy

  • 2009  –  Georgia

Born in 1976 in Georgia, Vladimir Stephania made his NBA debut with the Seattle SuperSonics after being drafted in the first round in 1998. He stayed with the SuperSonics for two seasons before playing for the New Jersey Nets (2000-2001), the Miami Heat (2001-2003), and the Portland Trail Blazers (2003-2004). During his 6-season NBA career as a Center, Stephania played 270 games, averaging 4.1 points per game.

Tracy Murray

Basketball

Served as envoy

  • 2009  –  Mozambique
  • 2012  –  Greece

Tracy Murray, one of the most decorated basketball players in UCLA history, began as color analyst for the Bruins in 2008. He has served in that capacity for every UCLA basketball season except 2015-16, where he left to become a shooting coach with the Los Angeles Lakers.

Murray played at UCLA from 1990-92 before enjoying a 12-year NBA career. He currently ranks 10th on the program’s all-time scoring list, having recorded 1,792 points in 98 career games. He averaged 18.3 points and 6.4 rebounds per game while helping UCLA to three-straight appearances in the NCAA Tournament, including a Sweet 16 trip in 1990 and an Elite Eight trip in 1992.

Murray, who starred at nearby Glendora High School, was selected in the first round of the 1992 NBA Draft by the San Antonio Spurs following his junior season with the Bruins. Through 12 NBA seasons, he played for the Portland Trailblazers, Houston Rockets, Toronto Raptors, Washington Wizards, Denver Nuggets and the Los Angeles Lakers. He concluded his NBA career with averages of 9.0 points per game and 2.5 rebounds per game in 659 total contests.