Shannon MacMillan

Soccer

Served as envoy

  • 2006  –  South Africa
  • 2010  –  Argentina
  • 2011  –  Guatemala

Shannon enjoyed a career with the US Women’s National team for 12 years; playing in 176 games and scoring 60 goals.

During that time she won a gold medal at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics, a silver medal at the 2000 Sydney Olympics and another gold as an alternate for the 2004 Greece Olympics. She also played a vital role in winning the 1999 Women’s World Cup and followed that up with a third place finish in the 2003 Women’s World Cup. In 2002, Shannon was named the US Soccer female athlete of the year. Shannon was a member of the US Soccer Envoys that conducted clinics in South Africa and Guatemala emphasizing the value of teamwork, respect, and leadership. In 2016, Shannon was elected to the US Soccer Hall of Fame.

In February of 2014, Shannon was inducted into the Cal South Hall of Fame.

Shannon currently holds a USSF National “B” license. She is a Certified Advance Sports Technology Facilitator. Shannon also is a Fox Soccer and ESPN/SEC analyst, covering matches such as the U17 and U20 Women’s World Cup.

Prior to joining the Sharks she was the Assistant Coach for the UCLA Womens team for two years, 2007-2009, helping lead the Bruins to two final four appearances. She is a 2008 Inductee to San Diego’s Breitbard Hall of Champions. Shannon graduated from the University of Portland with a degree in Social work. She was also a four time All American for the Pilots and the winner of the prestigious Hermann Award as college soccer’s top player in 1995.

Marcelo Balboa

Soccer

Served as envoy

  • 2006  –  Nigeria
  • 2008  –  Nigeria

Former San Diego State University men’s soccer player Marcelo Balboa was a two-time All-American and led the Aztecs to two NCAA Tournament appearances in 1988 and 1989. SDSU posted a combined record of 29-8-7 in Balboa’s two years and he was inducted to the Aztec Athletics Hall of Fame in 1995.

Following his time at SDSU, Balboa played professionally in Mexico and the U.S. until 2002, spending 1996-2001 with the Colorado Rapids of Major League Soccer (MLS).

On the international stage, Balboa became the first American to earn 100 caps with the U.S. National Team and played in three World Cups (1990, 1994, 1998). Balboa was named the U.S. Soccer Athlete of the Year in 1992 and 1994 and has been inducted into both the National Soccer Hall of Fame and the Colorado Hall of Fame.

Balboa has been broadcasting since 2003 and has covered the Colorado Rapids for Altitude TV the past 13 years. He coached his sons, Owen and Nicholas, at Monarch High School before becoming the head coach for the Colorado Rapids Development Academy’s U-14 squad.

Glenn Myernick

Soccer

Served as envoy

  • 2006  –  South Africa

An NASL and national-team defender who parlayed his playing career into a successful coaching career before his death at the age of 51. Myernick played 168 games during his eight seasons in the NASL, for Dallas, Portland and Tampa Bay, and appeared in the national team 10 times. He was coach of MLS’ Colorado Rapids for four years and an assistant coach of the U.S. teams at the 2002 and 2006 World Cups. Inducted in 2015.

Cynthia Cooper-Dyke

Basketball

Served as envoy

  • 2005  –  Senegal
  • 2006  –  Senegal
  • 2019  –  Italy

One of the most decorated players in the history of women’s basketball, Cynthia Cooper-Dyke returns to lead the Texas Southern women’s basketball program as its head coach.

Cooper-Dyke served as TSU’s head coach during the 2012-13 season before taking the reins at her alma mater, Southern California. She led the Lady Tigers to a 20-12 record and a trip to the postseason Women’s NIT in her only season at TSU. She had a 70-57 record in four seasons at USC before stepping down in 2017. Cooper-Dyke provided color commentary for Texas Southern basketball home broadcasts on AT&T Sports Net Houston during the 2017-18 season.

Cooper-Dyke arrived at TSU in 2012 after spending the past two seasons at UNC-Wilmington where she led the Seahawks to two of their most successful campaigns in 2010-11 and 2011-12, guiding the squad to a school-record 24 victories (2010) and its second consecutive postseason appearance with an at-large berth in the 2012 Postseason Women’s National Invitation Tournament. During the 2010-11 season UNCW was victorious in its first postseason contest, recording a 63-54 victory over Richmond before falling to Eastern Michigan in the second round.

That same year Cooper-Dyke was named CAA Coach-of-the-Year, marking the third time in her six-year collegiate coaching career that she has earned Coach-of-the-Year accolades. Freshman point guard Alisha Andrews garnered CAA Rookie-of-the-Year honors, while seniors Brittany Blackwell and Martha White were First and Second-Team All-Conference selections, respectively. All three players were named to the league’s All-Defensive Team.

Cooper-Dyke also achieved a personal milestone during the 2010-11 season, recording her 100th collegiate coaching victory with an 85-68 triumph at Northeastern on Jan. 23, 2011.

Cooper-Dyke was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame on August, 13, 2010. Part of the largest induction class in the Hall of Fame’s history, Cooper-Dyke was enshrined along with Karl Malone and Scottie Pippen, longtime LA Lakers owner Dr. Jerry Buss, St. Anthony’s (N.J.) high-school coach Bob Hurley, Sr., as well as former players Dennis Johnson, Gus Johnson and international star Maciel “Ubiratan” Pereira, all of whom will be honored posthumously. Also included in the enshrinement ceremony were the 1960 and 1992 US Men’s Olympic teams.

The former college great, Olympic gold medalist and Women’s National Basketball Association (WNBA) Most Valuable Player was named the ninth head coach in UNCW’s history on May 10, 2010 following a successful five-year stint at Prairie View A&M in central Texas.

Cooper-Dyke joined the Prairie View program in May of 2005 and guided the Lady Panthers to their first Southwestern Athletic Conference (SWAC) regular season title, SWAC Tournament crown and NCAA Tournament berth in 2006-07, collecting conference Coach-of-the-Year honors.

PVAMU repeated as SWAC regular season champions in 2008 and 2009 under Cooper-Dyke. The 2008 club made its first appearance in the WNIT and Cooper-Dyke was voted SWAC Coach-of-the-Year for the second time in 2009 after leading the Panthers to their second NCAA Tournament appearance.

Born in Chicago but raised in the Watts neighborhood of Los Angeles, Cooper-Dyke was a four-year standout at Southern California, where she sparked the Women of Troy to back-to-back NCAA championships in 1983 and 1984. She later completed her Bachelor’s Degree at Prairie View A&M.

Cooper-Dyke collected five medals while representing the United States. She won a gold medal at the 1987 Pan American Games in Indianapolis, captured gold at the 1988 Seoul Olympics, claimed gold at the 1986 and 1990 FIBA World Championships and won bronze at the 1992 Barcelona Olympic Games.

Cooper-Dyke began her professional career overseas and played 10 seasons in Spain and Italy. She returned to the United States in 1997 to play with the Houston Comets of the newly-formed WNBA.

She subsequently led the Comets to four consecutive WNBA championships and was named WNBA Finals MVP four times. Cooper-Dyke was voted the league’s MVP in 1997 and 1998 and was a four-time WNBA All-Star before retiring in 2000.

Cooper-Dyke moved into the coaching ranks in 2001 as the head coach of the Phoenix Mercury and spent two seasons on the sidelines before returning to the Comets’ playing roster briefly until an injury curtailed her season in 2003. She announced her final retirement prior to the start of the 2004 campaign and finished as Houston’s all-time leader in scoring (2,601 points), free throw percentage (.871) and assists (602).

Cooper-Dyke, who was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2010 and the Women’s Basketball Hall of Fame in 2009, has also been active beyond the basketball court. In 2000, she published her autobiography, “She Got Game: My Personal Odyssey,” chronicling her childhood, basketball career and her mother’s battle with breast cancer.

Curt Onalfo

Soccer

Served as envoy

  • 2006  –  Uganda

After starring as a defender at Ridgefield High School in Connecticut, Onalfo played collegiately for Bruce Arena at the University of Virginia from 1987-1990. In four seasons as a defender with the Cavaliers, he earned a pair of All-ACC First Team selections and helped the team win the 1988 ACC Championship. He began his professional career with French side La Ciotat in 1991, before featuring for the Connecticut Wolves of the USISL from 1994-95, and Mexican second division side Tampico Madero in 1995.

Onalfo was selected by the LA Galaxy in the inaugural MLS Draft and would make 13 appearances for the club in 1996, helping it reach the first ever MLS Cup. The defender went on to register 23 appearances across four seasons in MLS, spending additional time with San Jose (1997) and D.C. United (1998-99). He recorded one international cap with the U.S. Men’s National Team and featured extensively at the youth level, including the 1989 FIFA World Youth Championship, the 1991 Pan American Games, and the 1992 Summer Olympics.

Onalfo’s journey took a detour soon after the 1992 Olympics, when a diagnosis of stage three Hodgkin’s disease at the age of 24 disrupted his career and nearly ended his life. After surviving his arduous battle with cancer, Onalfo resumed his playing career with Connecticut and then Mexican side Tampico FC, before joining the Galaxy for the inaugural MLS season. He owns 13 total years of MLS coaching experience, highlighted by stints as head coach of D.C. United (2010), the then-Kansas City Wizards (2007-09), and the LA Galaxy (2017). While continuing as an assistant with the Galaxy, he also served as the inaugural head coach of USL Championship side LA Galaxy II from 2014-16, where he led the club to a Western Conference title in 2015. When he departed “Los Dos” to take over head coaching duties with the Galaxy first team, his overall record with the developmental side finished at 46-29-20.

Tiffany Roberts-Sahaydak

Soccer

Served as envoy

  • 2006  –  Uganda
  • 2007  –  Philippines
  • 2010  –  Thailand
  • 2011  –  Brazil
  • 2014  –  Brazil
  • 2015  –  Indonesia
  • 2017  –  Belarus
  • 2017  –  Albania
  • 2019  –  Egypt

An Olympic gold medalist, World Cup champion and two-time NCAA champion, Tiffany Roberts Sahaydak was named head women’s soccer coach at UCF in May 2013.

A three-time American Athletic Conference Coach of the Year, Roberts Sahaydak has wasted no time in putting her stamp on UCF’s successful program. Under her guidance, the Knights have earned four NCAA Tournament bids and four American Athletic Conference championships while boasting 11 conference Player of the Year awards and 38 all-league and tournament selections.

In her first season (2013), she led UCF to a school-record unbeaten streak (18 matches), an NSCAA national standing through much of the year and the program’s first undefeated conference season since 1999. In addition, UCF made history as the first program to win an American Athletic Conference Championship.

Roberts Sahaydak came to Orlando after serving six seasons at VCU alongside her co-head coach, husband and current UCF associate head coach Tim Sahaydak.

Roberts Sahaydak spent a decade with the U.S. National Team from 1994-2004, earning 112 caps (with 60 starts). Her career was highlighted by three women’s World Cups – among them, the unforgettable 1999 championship – and a gold medal with the 1996 Olympic team.

After retiring from the USWNT, she has served as an ambassador for U.S. Soccer with the U.S. Department of State Sports Envoy Program since 2007, promoting the power and benefit of sport internationally. With the program, she has visited Indonesia, Uganda, the Philippines, Thailand, Namibia, Brazil and France. In 2014, she was appointed to President Barack Obama’s Presidential Delegation to the Federative Republic of Brazil at the opening of the FIFA World Cup in Brazil. She is a native of San Ramon, Calif., and was selected as the 1994 California High School Player of the Year.

She was a three-time Parade High School All-American, a three-time NSCAA All-American and was the two-time National Girl’s High School Player of the Year. She debuted for the Stars and Stripes in 1994 when she was only 16 as one of the youngest players ever to suit up for the National Team. She played in her first FIFA Women’s World Cup a month after her 18th birthday and won Olympic gold before she was out of her teens (USSoccer.com).

As a collegian, Roberts Sahaydak was a standout midfielder for North Carolina (1995-98) as a three-time All-ACC First Team selection. She led the Tar Heels to two NCAA titles (1996, 1997) during her tenure, was voted the 1998 ACC Tournament MVP and finished third in voting for collegiate soccer’s highest honor, the Hermann Trophy.

She still ranks among the top five for career starts in UNC’s record book.She was a two-time captain for the Carolina Courage in the first fully professional U.S. women’s league (Women’s United Soccer Association). She helped the Courage win the 2002 title after finishing last in the team’s inaugural campaign one year prior.

Roberts Sahaydak took over VCU’s program in 2007 and led the Rams to three conference championship game appearances. She was voted as the 2011 Colonial Athletic Association Co-Head Coach of the Year, along with her husband Tim. The duo mentored two CAA Defenders of the Year, one CAA Rookie of the Year and 20 all-conference players, including six first-team honorees.The Sahaydaks reside in Orlando with their two daughters, Layla and Evie.

“It’s been a life changing experience being involved in the Sports Diplomacy Envoys. I have had the good fortune of participating in programs all over the globe, and I’ve worked together with people from diverse backgrounds and cultures. I am constantly reminded that sport can bring us closer together. We can celebrate our differences and our common interests. Every time we start to play a game we start to connect and the world seems to get a bit smaller.”

Cindy Parlow Cone

Soccer

Served as envoy

  • 2006  –  Bahrain
  • 2008  –  El Salvador
  • 2010  –  Azerbaijan

Current: Currently President of United States Soccer Federation. Prior to this, Parlow Cone served as Vice President for a year before being inducted as President. She was also inducted into the National Soccer Hall of Fame in 2018.

U.S. National Team: One of the greatest scorers in U.S. history, she retired from international soccer in 2006 after having played 158 times for the USA while scoring 75 goals, good for fifth all-time on the U.S. scoring list … Also had 31 assists in her nine-year National Team career … Youngest player ever to win both an Olympic gold medal and a Women’s World Cup title … Played in her final international match on Dec. 8, 2004, a 5-0 win over Mexico that was also the final game for Mia Hamm, Julie Foudy, Joy Fawcett and Brandi Chastain … 2004: Played in two matches at the 2004 Olympics, starting one … Played in 24 total matches, starting 11 and scored 10 goals with eight assists, finishing third on the team in scoring behind Abby Wambach and Mia Hamm … Scored six of her 10 goals in two games, getting hat tricks against Haiti at the CONCACAF Olympic Qualifying Tournament and against Ireland on the “Fan Celebration Tour” … Her two hat tricks gave her seven for her career, moving her past Michelle Akers and putting her in second place on the all-time hat tricks list, one behind Mia Hamm … 2003: Started 17 of the 19 games she played, scoring eight goals with one assist … Became just the fifth player in U.S. history to score 60 or more goals (there are now six) … Scored four goals against England on May 17 in Birmingham, Ala., it was her first-four goal game for the USA … Started five games during the Women’s World Cup, scoring two goals, both on headers, against Sweden and Nigeria … 2002: Scored 11 goals, second best on the team, in just 14 games, all of which she started … Scored twice in a big 4-0 win over Norway on April 27 … Scored six goals across four consecutive games, sandwiched by two-goal games on July 21 (a 4-0 win over Norway) and Oct. 2 (a 4-0 win over Australia) … Scored five goals in the 2002 CONCACAF Women’s Gold Cup, including a hat trick in the 7-0 semi-final win over Costa Rica that earned the U.S. a berth in the 2003 Women’s World Cup … 2001: Played in three matches for the USA during a limited schedule, starting all three and scoring one goal, that against Germany in the only game of the 2001 Nike U.S. Women’s Cup … 2000: Had a breakout scoring year, leading the team with 19 goals and seven assists … Had four hat tricks, one short of a U.S. record for a calendar year … Had back-to-back hat tricks in the Pacific Cup on June 2 vs. Canada and June 4 vs. New Zealand, making her only the second U.S. player to ever score three goals in two consecutive games … Played in 31 games, but only started 15, scoring a goal for every 76 minutes on the field … Was one of just two players to come off the bench for the USA in their run to the silver medal in the 2000 Olympics … Played a total of 112 minutes across the five Olympic matches … 1999: Started all six games for the USA in the 1999 Women’s World Cup, scoring two goals with two assists, including the first goal against Brazil in the semifinal … Emerged as a starter for the USA in March of ’99 after finally overcoming a nagging hamstring injury … Also scored in the USA’s 7 1 win over Nigeria in Women’s World Cup first round play on a diving header … 1998: Saw limited action for the USA in 1998 due to senior year commitments to North Carolina, but played in 13 games, starting seven, and scored goals against world powers Norway and Germany … Was a member of the Goodwill Games gold medal-winning team during the summer of 1998 … Won U.S. Soccer’s first Chevy Young Female Athlete of the Year Award in 1998 … 1997: Scored the winning goal in the championship game of Nike U.S. Women’s Cup ’97, heading in a cross from Kristine Lilly in the 2 0 win over Italy … 1996: Was the youngest member of the gold medal-winning team at the 1996 Olympics at age 18 … Scored twice in her full U.S. National Team debut against Russia on Jan. 14, 1996, in Campinas, Brazil … 1995: First trained with the U.S. Women’s National Team in March 1995 … Youth National Teams: Played with the U.S. Under 20 National Team at the 1997 Nordic Cup championship in Denmark in 1997, scoring twice in the tournament to lead the USA to the championship … Also played for the U.S. Under 21s at the Nordic Cup in Holland in the summer of 1998, leading the team in scoring with two goals … Was also a member of the U 16 National Team pool … First Appearance: Jan. 14, 1996, vs. Russia … First Goal: Jan. 14, 1996, vs. Russia.

Professional / Club: A founding player in the WUSA for the Atlanta Beat … 2003: Helped the Beat to the Founders Cup championship match with a solid season that included three goals and five assists as she started 17 of the 18 games in which she played … Played mostly in the midfield for the Beat … Named as a reserve to the WUSA All-Star Team … 2002: Started 18 of the 19 games in which she played, scoring five goals with four assists … Helped the Beat to the playoffs for the second consecutive year … 2001: Helped lead the Beat to the WUSA championship game … Scored the game-winning goal in sudden death overtime against the Philadelphia Charge in the WUSA semifinals … Had five goals and seven assists for the Beat during the regular season, finishing 10th in the league in scoring … Was named to the All-WUSA Second Team … Etc.: Her Memphis Football Club won the state championship from 1990 1995 and finished second in the nation at the U 17 level in 1995 … Her club won regional championships in 1992 and 1995 … Named MVP at the 1995 Under 17 U.S. Youth Soccer national tournament.

College / High School: Ended her career for the University of North Carolina with 68 goals and 53 assists in 103 games … The consensus top player in college soccer in 1998, she won both the Hermann Trophy and the M.A.C. Player of the Year Award, joining Mia Hamm as the only two time winner of both awards … Also won the Hermann and M.A.C. after her junior year … Helped UNC to an undefeated regular season and to the NCAA championship game in 1998, leading the team in scoring with 21 goals and 11 assists … Led UNC in game winning goals with seven and was named 1998 ACC Player of the Year … Named a First Team NSCAA All American four times (1995, ’96, ’97 and ’98) … As a junior, she helped UNC to the 1997 NCAA championship, scoring 13 goals with 18 assists … Scored the game-winning goal in the final … Was a First Team All ACC selection in 1996, ’97 and ’98 and the MVP of the ACC Tournament in 1997 … Named to the NCAA All Tournament Team all four years … Overcame early season injuries to lead North Carolina to the 1996 NCAA championship as a sophomore … Scored 15 goals and had 11 assists for 41 points and was a finalist for the 1996 Hermann Trophy and M.A.C. Award … Was the Soccer America Freshman of the Year in 1995 … Voted All ACC and ACC Rookie of the Year as a freshman … Had 17 goals and 12 assists in her freshman year at UNC … Entered the University of North Carolina after completing high school in three years … Named the 1994 Tennessee High School Player of the Year … Was a three time all region and all state selection at Germantown High … Was also honored as MVP of state and regional tournaments … Was one of only two players in Tennessee prep history to score more than 100 goals in a career (105 in just three seasons) and is the all time state leader in assists with 83 … Was also a two time high school All American … Named school MVP in basketball as a freshman.

Personal: Full name is Cynthia Marie Parlow Cone… Nickname is “CP” … Was a member of the ACC Academic Honor Roll from 1996 1998 … Enjoys golf, reading and watching movies … Grew up playing soccer against her three brothers (two older and one younger) … Had a 4.0 GPA in high school and ranked in the top five percent in her class … Majored in Education at UNC …Graduated from UNC with honors… Favorite movie is “Shawshank Redemption” … Favorite athlete is Lance Armstrong … Favorite restaurant is The Latern, an Asian fusion place in Chapel Hill, but her favorite food is “anything my mom cooks”… Her favorite book is “The Power of One” by Bryce Courtenay … Has a street ( Cindy Parlow Drive ) named after her in her hometown of Memphis , Tenn. … Holds her own soccer camps in Chapel Hill, North Carolina as well as Cheyenne, Wyoming.

Lauren Gregg

Soccer

Served as envoy

  • 2006  –  Nigeria
  • 2008  –  Nigeria
  • 2012  –  Argentina
  • 2016  –  China

A long-time assistant coach of the U.S. Women’s National Team, Lauren Gregg was a member of the coaching staff for the U.S. at the 1991 FIFA Women’s World Cup in China, the 1995 FIFA Women’s World Cup in Sweden and the 1996 Olympic Games in the USA.
During her tenure as assistant coach, from 1989-2000, Gregg also served as U.S. U-21 Women’s National Team head coach, leading the team to Nordic Cup titles in the 1997 and 1999 editions of the tournament and second place in the 1998 Nordic Cup.

Prior to becoming an assistant coach with U.S. Soccer, Gregg led the University of Virginia to the NCAA Final Four in 1991 and seven straight NCAA tournaments, from 1988-94. Gregg was named NSCAA Coach of the Year in 1990 and was the first woman to lead a team to the NCAA Division I Final Four.

Gregg holds a U.S. Soccer “A” coaching license and earned one cap for the U.S. Women’s National Team in 1986.